The Omo Valley of Terri Gold

I have to be honest. When I saw this series I immediatly had a mix feeling: I liked it, at the same time that I had the thought: well, now we have infrared being trendy (after Mosse). And I’m not a trendy guy. I went to Terri Gold´s website and I found something quite curious. This series is good. However, when she took almost the same photos with another camera, in colour, I didn’t like. Maybe it was just Gold´s colour editing that I didn’t find interesting, looking like a bit of HDR with bit of vintage look, that can result in other kind of theme but not in this one. Then I saw some other series and I really didn’t find anything interesting due to some bad compositions, editing, or just interestingness factor. They are not good. None of them came out like this one. And this one is good. In fact it is the only one I saw being published by other mags and zines as well. This brought me some other thoughts: is the infrared that is making this interesting? I didn’t see any other work by Richard Mosse before, apart from his winning infrared series. Is the infrared the interesting part? Maybe, because Mosse’s other work is not as interesting as it can be his infrared series in Eastern Congo that won the 2014 Deutsche Börse Photography Prize. (although his other works are quite good).
If I was to be mean I would thought: maybe she took a better assistant this time to carry her infrared camera. But hey!, the important is that this series is good, so let’s focus on this one of the Omo Valley in infrared. If you’re curious enough, go see her other works at
Terri Gold‘s website.

This is what Terri Gold says about this series: “My earliest memories are of spinning a globe. I was always drawn to the last mysterious corners of the world. I am interested in exploring the rituals that lend meaning to people’s lives. I am looking for the grace notes, for the sense of wonder in our world and in our connections to each other. We are still and still moving.
From the beginning of my career I was looking for a medium that could portray the world how I experienced it, with all its mysteries.  My search led to infrared photography. There is a haunting quality to the invisible, iridescent world of infrared light that touches another dimension, which exists just beyond what our eyes can see.
Indigenous cultures are disappearing.  At risk is a vast archive of knowledge and expertise. Ethiopia’s Omo Valley is thought of as the birthplace of humankind, and is home to various ethnic groups, whose time-honored traditions and elaborate rituals dignify survival in a challenging landscape.
With globalization comes the push of technology into once isolated areas such as the Omo, threatening to forever alter the old ways.  What is the value of these ancient practices? What becomes of us when the myriad voices of indigenous people have fallen silent?  I am interested in the debate between the old and the new. What will be discarded and what will be treasured?”

Omo Valley by Terri Gold

Omo Valley by Terri Gold

Omo Valley by Terri Gold

Omo Valley by Terri Gold

Omo Valley by Terri Gold

Omo Valley by Terri Gold

Omo Valley by Terri Gold

Omo Valley by Terri Gold

Omo Valley by Terri Gold

Omo Valley by Terri Gold

Omo Valley by Terri Gold

Omo Valley by Terri Gold

Omo Valley by Terri Gold

Omo Valley by Terri Gold

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Omo Valley by Terri Gold

Omo Valley by Terri Gold

Omo Valley by Terri Gold

Omo Valley by Terri Gold

Omo Valley by Terri Gold

Omo Valley by Terri Gold

Omo Valley by Terri Gold

Omo Valley by Terri Gold

Omo Valley by Terri Gold

Omo Valley by Terri Gold

more related posts you want to read:

Keiyo Street, by Sebastian Schlüter;
Ecce Homo by Evelyn Bencicova;
Autistic Solitude vs. Loneliness: the B Shot by a Stranger project;  
Hymnal of Dreams, by Elijah Gowin
The Grotesque Flagellantism, by Gerard Asay;
From Transylvania with Love, by Vlad Dumitrescu;
Flamboya, by Viviane Sassen
Occupied Pleasures, by Tanya Habjouqa

A Shamanic Totem, by Gonzalo Bénard.

June, 2014 by ©Gonzalo Bénard for 2HeadS
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For any other contact about 2HeadS or my Photographic Work, from Art Galleries, Curators, Art Collectors, etc, please use the GBénard/2HeadS email. Thank you.

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